Lower Blood Pressure with these Divine Hibiscus Tea Recipes

Since ancient times, people have been drinking hibiscus tea, which has a fruity and tart flavor and is brewed from dried red hibiscus flowers. You may serve this tea hot or cold, and it is simple to make. You can steep the flowers in boiling water for a few minutes to make tea (and chill it to make iced tea). This method enables you to experience the full flavor of hibiscus. If you're experiencing high blood pressure, try drinking more hibiscus tea, as it may help improve your condition.

How Can Drinking Hibiscus Tea Reduce High Blood Pressure?

What’s the science behind hibiscus tea’s effect on one’s blood pressure? According to a study, drinking hibiscus tea helped participants who were at risk of developing high blood pressure as well as those who already had modestly elevated blood pressure.

For six weeks, participants drank three 8-ounce cups of hibiscus tea or a placebo every day. Comparing those who drank the hibiscus tea to those who drank the placebo, those who drank the hibiscus tea had a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure.

According to a body of research published in 2015, drinking hibiscus tea significantly reduced both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. 

Hibiscus Tea Ingredients and Steps

  • Half cup of hibiscus blossoms, dried
  • 4 cups of filtered water
  • 10–20 drops of liquid stevia or another sugar alternative, as desired
  1. In 4 cups of boiling water, steep 1/2 cup of the dried flowers for 10 to 15 minutes.
  2. When finished, add your sugar alternative and serve hot or cold over ice. If you'd prefer to use date syrup, start with a little bit, perhaps a few tablespoons, and add more until you get the desired sweetness.
  3. To reduce the tartness, you can also add pomegranate juice (straight, without sweeteners), which is virtually just as beneficial to your health.

While hibiscus tea is beneficial, too much of anything can produce unwanted side effects on your health. Hence, it’s best to limit your daily intake of this hibiscus tea recipe to one quart.

Recipe Variations

While the recipe is good as is, there are a few things you can add to it depending on the taste profile of the tea you prefer.

  • A pinch of cinnamon gives the tea a warm, subtly spicy flavor.
  • A few mint leaves give the tea a cooling flavor.
  • Like citrrus? You might add a few lemon slices or a splash of lemon juice.

How to Store Your Hibiscus Tea

You can store your brewed hibiscus tea in the refrigerator in an airtight container, for up to four or five days. 

Hibiscus Tea Blends

If you’re a fan of hibiscus tea and would like to try some ready-made tea blends, here are some to try out.

The Ruby Moon™ Hibiscus Elderberry tea is a tart and jammy, deep crimson blend masterfully created for immunity and a strong heart. Along with ingredients like organic elderberry, black currant, and cranberry, the tea serves as a good source of vitamin C while being deliciously caffeine-free.

Another great option is our Pink Tourmaline tea. Made with organic hibiscus, this bright pink white tea blend is teeming with adaptogens & wellness herbs like Schisandra berry, Shatavari, Ginkgo Biloba & Echinacea. What are you waiting for?

Try incorporating nutrient-packed hibiscus tea into your diet today!